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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 191-202

Comparison of prevalence of psychological morbidities, associated factors, and coping styles between pre/para-clinical and clinical undergraduate medical students: A rural institution-based cross-sectional study in a northern state of india


1 Department of Psychiatry, Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women, Sonipat, Haryana, India
2 Department of Medicine, Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women, Sonipat, Haryana, India
3 Department of Paediatrics, Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women, Sonipat, Haryana, India
4 Department of Community Medicine, Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women, Sonipat, Haryana, India
5 English Tutor, Kirori Mal College, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Sunny Garg
Department of Psychiatry, Bhagat Phool Singh Government Medical College for Women, Khanpur Kalan, Sonipat, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/MJBL.MJBL_105_21

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Background: Psychological morbidities are high among undergraduate medical students. They experience the transition between pre/para-clinical and clinical training as a stressful period, and cope differently. Research from India in this regard is lacking. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the prevalence of psychological morbidities, associated factors, and coping styles between pre/para-clinical and clinical undergraduate medical students. Materials and Methods: This institution-based cross-sectional observational design study was conducted among pre/para-clinical and clinical group of undergraduate medical students (a total of 382) by using a questionnaire in the period between April and June 2021. Stratified random sampling technique was used to select the study participants. The survey included standard self-administered questionnaires like general health questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and Lin-Chen’s coping inventory to assess psychological morbidities and coping styles, respectively. Associated factors for psychological morbidities, and coping styles between two groups were compared using chi-square test, independent t test, and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Of the 382 responders, psychological morbidities (GHQ-28 score >23) were found in 61% of participants. Both groups reported a high level, a slightly higher preponderance in clinical (61.5%) than pre/para-clinical students (60.6%), and with nonsignificant difference of psychological morbidities. Compared to pre/para-clinical group, clinical group was found to have more substance consumption behavior (P < 0.001), dissatisfaction with academic performance (P < 0.001), sought psychiatric consultation (P < 0.05), and currently on psychiatric treatment (P < 0.05). Overall, coping was found to be average and good among the participants. Active problem coping behavior was more significantly used by pre/para-clinical group, whereas passive problem coping and passive emotional coping behavior were positively significantly correlated with psychological morbidities in the clinical group. Conclusions: This study established a significant correlation between psychological morbidities and passive coping styles in the clinical group. These students need interventions to encourage the use of more active coping styles during the training to provide advances in future career. A strong correlation with dissatisfied academic performance may be a call for an efficient and more student-friendly curriculum.


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