• Users Online: 448
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 71-75

The Association between Hyponatremia and Recurrent Febrile Convulsion


Al-Basrah Health Directorate, Ministry of Health, Basra, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Hadeel Rashid Abdul Hameed
Al-Basrah Health Directorate, Ministry of Health, Basra
Iraq
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/MJBL.MJBL_91_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: Febrile seizures are a common pediatric problem, yet there is a great deal of disagreement about the appropriate diagnostic evaluation of a child with this disorder. Different predisposing factors have suggested enhancing the susceptibility to febrile seizure and its recurrence. Objective: To determine the effect of hyponatremia in recurrent febrile convulsions. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was carried out at Al-Zahraa teaching hospital in Al-Najaf city during the period between 1 January and the end of October 2021. One hundred fifty children in the age range between six months and six years old were studied. We classified the patients into three groups: Group (A) included 50 children who presented with fever without seizure; group (B) included 50 children who presented with simple febrile convulsion; and group (C) included 50 children who presented with recurrent febrile convulsions. Group A was considered as the control group. The serum level of sodium Na+ was estimated in these three groups by Na kits. Results: There was no significant difference between males and females, in all age groups. Also, it was shown that a family history of febrile convulsion represented 20%, 50%, and 50% in groups A, B, and C, respectively; a family history of recurrent febrile convulsion represented 4%, 4%, and 10%, in groups A, B, and C, respectively; and a family history of epilepsy represented 0%, 4%, and 0% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. A value of P in family history of febrile convulsion was 0.002, in family history of recurrent febrile convulsion was 0.345, and in family history of epilepsy was 0.132. Therefore, there was no significant difference in all parameters except a family history of febrile convulsion that was significant in all three groups. Also, the study will show no significant difference in age, white blood cell count, and random blood surge whereas there is a significant difference in temperature. A significant difference in serum sodium level was the lowest in group C. Regarding calcium level, there was a significant difference between groups A and B. Conclusion: There is a significant association between recurrent febrile convulsion and lower level of serum sodium, in which serum sodium concentration is lower in those patients with recurrent febrile convulsion.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed226    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded19    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal